CEDS – Transportation & Infrastructure

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TRANSPORTATION & INFRSTRUCTURE Goal:

Through partnerships and collaboration, increase access to planning and funding resources to support Bristol Bay Communities Transportation and Infrastructure needs to sustain and grow the region

Project: Design and construct new Southwest Alaska Vocational and Training Center

Project Description: A well trained regional and state workforce are integral to the economic and health of a community and region. There is no reason to import workers, when residents can stay in the region and become highly skilled to earn a living wage in a facility that meets industry demands in relevant industry sectors: alternative & renewable energy, education, hospitality and tourism, maritime, fishing & seafood processing, construction, health care, information technology, natural resource development (oil, gas & mining and transportation and subsistence).

  • Partner Organizations for Operation:
  • SAVEC, Bristol Bay Economic Development Corporation, Bristol Bay Native Association, Bristol Bay Native Corporation, UAF Bristol Bay Campus, Bristol Bay Borough, Lake & Peninsula Borough, Bristol Bay Area Health Corporation, Bristol Bay Housing Authority
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: Unknown
  • Timeline: July 1, 2022 – June 30, 2025
  • Funding Partners: USDA, EDA, Village Tribal Councils, BBNA, BBAHC, BBNC, BBHA, Bristol Bay Borough, Lake & Peninsula Borough, BBEDC, UAF-BBC, Federal funders, Private funder
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Anishia Elbie
  • Title: Co-Executive Director
  • Organization: Southwest Alaska Vocational & Education Center (SAVEC)

Project: Support City of Aleknagik’s Capital Improvement Projects

Project Description: Aleknagik’s Vision Statement: Aleknagik is a healthy and family-oriented community that continues to develop by improving infrastructure, diversifying the economy, and training the workforce, while protecting social and cultural values, including a positive environment for families, opportunities for subsistence, and preservation of natural resources and a pristine environment (Aleknagik Comprehensive Plan 2005).

Goals:

  1. Keep north shores and south shores of the village connected.
  2. Plan for future housing.
  3. Guide future development.
  4. Protect and ensure access to important subsistence areas.
  5. Protect and reserve trails and lake access for all residents. Identify and reserve key community recreation sites.
  6. Plan for impacts of Wood River Bridge and road, and of steadily increasing tourism and recreation use.
  7. Manage lake and surrounding lands to protect water and air quality and sensitive habitat areas, and to maintain a clean, safe village environment.
  8. Maintain identity distinct from Dillingham.

Outline of Steps to Support FY 2023 Capital Improvement Priorities for Aleknagik:

  1. Village Safe Water Construction
  2. Emergency Generator Power Access Upgrade for City Buildings ($80,600.00)
  3. Public Safety and Heavy Equipment Maintenance Building ($6,308,391.00)
  4. Heavy Equipment:  Grader, Brush Cutter ($159,653.26), etc.
  5. City Road Improvements
  6. Power Utility Expansion to Landfill and New Subdivisions
  7. Landfill Improvements
  8. Abatement and Demolition of Community Center ($653,637.00)
    1. (a.k.a. Seven Day Adventist Church)
  9. Boat Storage Expansion/Improvements
  10. City Gravesite Expansion/Improvements
  11. Housing for Education and Public Health Personnel
  12. Recreational Site/Trails Improvements (Winter and Summer Use)
  13. Community Center Building
  14. South Shore Float Plane Dock
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • City of Aleknagik, Alaska Department of Transportation (DOT), Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC), State of Alaska, Village Safe Water (VSW) and Solid Waste, Other Federal and State agencies
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: See Above
  • Timeline: 2022-2026
  • Funding Partners:  Federal, State, Regional and Local Governments, Organizations, and Agencies
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Kay Andrews
  • Title: City Administrator
  • Organization: City of Aleknagik

Project: Support Bristol Bay Borough Infrastructure Projects.

The Bristol Bay Borough is the commercial fishing industry hub for the region, because of this the infrastructure of the community not only supports the Borough but supports all the Bristol Bay communities to varying levels and supports most of the commercial fishing industry. To ensure the Borough can service the industry and surround communities it is imperative that the Borough has the necessary infrastructure to support industry needs. In the spring, many regional community members and fish processors travel to the Naknek community for the summer to participate in the commercial and subsistence fisheries. They use the infrastructure in the Borough to support their needs during the summer months.

  • List of projects to be completed and Costs associated:
  • ***Please note: Complete project descriptions are available on the BBB webpage- Planning CIP

Category “A” Priorities

Category A contains the Borough’s highest priority Capital Improvement Projects.  These projects will command the largest percentage of the Borough’s time and efforts until they are completed.  They will have the most significant impact on the region’s economic development and quality of life.  The completion of these projects will result in social and/or economic benefits for the State of Alaska, the Bristol Bay Borough and the region.  Projects that are nominated for the State Transportation Improvement Program (STIP) are indicated by the letters “STIP”. Projects that were submitted to the Community Transportation Program (CTP) are indicated by the letters “CTP.”

  • 1)         PHASE II Bristol Bay Borough School Renovation Project. Cost overrun due to the presence of undetected Asbestos and Dry Rot Funding request to reimburse the Bristol Bay Borough for excessive, unexpected expenditures to complete the project, outside of the original DEED Grant funding: $2,200,000
  • 2)         Naknek King Salmon Pathway Project (STIP) (7) “CTP” (2). Pedestrian and bicycle path along the Alaska Peninsula Highway, From Downtown Naknek to Donna G Subdivision Phase I (STIP): $1,700,000. From Flat Nose Henry St. to Downtown King Salmon Phase II (STIP): $1,700,000 From Donna G Subdivision to Flat Nose Henry St. Phase III (STIP): $3,466,700. Total Estimated Cost $6, 866,700
  • 3)         South Naknek Road Improvements STIP (4) CTP (1): Surfacing improvements to all Borough maintained roads in South Naknek. The rehabilitation would include placing a base course of approximately six inches of “pit-run” rock, topped with six inches of “D-1” grade gravel to form a reliable, long lasting driving surface. $1,512,000.
  • 4)         PHASE II King Salmon Sewer Upgrade. Replacement of all lift station equipment, grinder pumps, improve utility access holes and sewer lines as needed. UV Treatment of Sewer Lagoons, King Salmon Treatment Plant: $ 5,000, 000
  • 5)         PHASE II Naknek Sewer System Upgrade. Naknek Sewer Improvements Phase II approximately 2.2 miles to the East from the Naknek Trading Lift Station. Approximately 15,000 LF of sewer main, upgrade of gravity sewer and force mains, upgrades to the Port Lift Station and Leader Creek Lift Station. The project will provide capacity increases to the entire system. The reconnection and repair of sewer service lines. Engineering and Design work has been completed: $12,300,000
  • 6)         Recovered Heat Line Replacement (BBB Loop Only) Replacement of recovered heat lines that provide heat from the Naknek Electric Generation Plant to the Borough owned facilities on the BBB facility loop to include the ambulance barn, clinic and pool: $1,500,000
  • 7)         PHASE III Naknek Sewer System Upgrade: $17,700,000
  • 8)         Bristol Bay Borough Bridge / Hydro Projects: $40,000,000
  • 9)         Port of BBB Dock Expansion Construction Phase Ill STIP (8): $6,500,000
  • 10)       Public Safety Building Fire and EMS (located at a mid-point AK Pen Hwy.): $5,000,000
  • 11)       Industrial Park and Small Boat Facility: $7,000,000
  • 12)       South Naknek Dock and Road Access Improvements STIP (2): $6,000,000
  • 13)       Naknek By-Pass Link, Road & Pathway Projects STIP (9): $1,560,000
  • 14)       Shoulder Improvements to the Alaska Peninsula Highway between Naknek and King Salmon: $10,000,000
  • 15)       South Naknek Beach Access Road STIP (1): $1,000,000
  • 16)       Bristol Bay Borough Playground Equipment Replacement: $1,500,000
  • 17)       Public Works Facility Building and Equipment Yard: $1,500,000

CATEGORY B

  • Category B contains Capital Improvement Project Priorities that are of lower cost, assistance by legislative funding is needed to accomplish these improvements for the citizens of the Bristol Bay Borough
  • 1)         Multi-Use Community Recreation Center – Teen Center $500,000
  • 2)         Emergency Back Up Generators for Borough Emergency Shelters $180,000
  • 3)         Sand Storage Buildings (2) $500,000
  • 4)         Bristol Bay Borough Sewer Lagoon Pump House Improvements $300,000
  • 5)         Acquire and Retrofit King Salmon Airforce Base Gym $500,000
  • 6)         Airport Parking Long term and short-term King Salmon Airport $500,000

OTHER BOROUGH PRIORITIES

1)         Lake Camp / Rapids Camp Road Improvements: $3,000,000

Project: Add six inches of E-1 surface course gravel, remove brush on both sides of the roadway and apply environmentally friendly dust control to approximately 11 miles of roadway to boat launches that access Katmai Nation Park & Preserve / Brooks Camp.

Purpose: To improve drivability, safety and health of local residents, tourists and visitors to Katmai National Park & Preserve.

  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • The Bristol Bay Borough; State of Alaska, Department of Transportation,
  • Funding Partners:
  • US DOT, USDA: AK Village Solid waste, EDA, FEMA, USDA Federal, Bonds, DEC-Loan Program, EPA, Rural Community Assistance Corporation, HUD: Community Development Block Grant, State of Alaska Harbor Facility Grant Program, Alaska Clean Water Actions Grant, State of Alaska Loan Programs
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name:
  • Title: Borough Planner
  • Organization: Bristol Bay Borough

Project: Support Lake and Peninsula Borough Infrastructure Projects.

The infrastructure projects listed below improve the quality of life for each community helping to ensure happy, healthy, and functional Bristol Bay families and communities.

List of projects to be completed:

  • BOROUGH-WIDE PRIORITIES
  • 1.         Iliamna Dock/Breakwater
  • 2.         Borough Maps/GIS
  • 3.         Chignik Hydro
  • CITY OF CHIGNIK
  • Short Term Priorities
  • 1)         Community Building
  • 2)         Completion of Dam Access Trail
  • 3)         Dockside Warehouse
  • Long Term Priorities
  • 1)         Airport Improvement
  • 2)         Hydro-Dam
  • 3)         Harbor Completion
  • CHIGNIK LAGOON
  • Short Term Priorities
  • 1)         Emergency shelter
  • 2)         Water Distribution Upgrade
  • 3)         Grader
  • 4)         Rock screening truck
  • Long Term Priorities
  • 1)         Road to Landfill
  • 2)         Clinic/Garage/Hangar/Apartment
  • 3)         Alternative Energy
  • CHIGNIK LAKE
  • Short Term Priorities
  • 1)         Power line & Power Meter Box Upgrade
  • 2)         Airport Lights
  • 3)         Duplex Housing
  • Long Term Priorities
  • 1)         Emergency shelter
  • 2)         Multi-Purpose Building
  • 3)         Boat Ramp
  • NEWHALEN
  • Short Term Priorities
  • 1)         Support Landfill Burn Bin‐fencing
  • 2)         Appropriate Land for Old Cars
  • 3)         Subsistence Harvest Building
  • 4)         Support Community Playground/Park
  • 5)         Support PCE
  • 6)         Support Letter with Newhalen Tribal for Trooper and VPSO for Newhalen
  • Long Term Priorities
  • 1)         Land Planning for Housing
  • 2)         Road extension completion/safety Trails
  • 3)         Newhalen dock
  • 4)         Assistant living home/apartments
  • 5)         Garage to store City Equipment and Office Space
  • CITY OF EGEGIK
  • Short Term Priorities
  • 1)         Airport Lighting & Improvements
  • 2)         Tank Farm Repair
  • 3)         New City Shop
  • Long Term Priorities
  • 1)         Repair Water Plant
  • NONDALTON
  • Short Term Priorities
  • 1)         Complete Bulk Fuel Storage
  • 2)         Heavy Equipment Repairs
  • 3)         Road Improvement Project
  • 4)         Cold Storage for Heavy Equipment
  • 5)         New Fire Truck
  • 6)         Carnival
  • Long Term Priorities
  • 1)         Sewer System Improvements
  • 2)         New Water storage tank
  • 3)         Rehab brown building
  • 4)         New multi‐purpose building
  • 5)         Heated storage for heavy equipment
  • 6)         Community park improvements
  • 7)         Housing development
  • 8)         VPSO housing
  • PEDRO BAY
  • Short Term Priorities
  • 1)         Former School Acquisition
  • 2)         New Landfill Development 
  • 3)         Fire Fighting Equipment
  • Long Term Priorities
  • 1)         Knutson Creek Hydro Construction
  • 2)         Former School Acquisition
  • 3)         Boat Landing Dock 
  • UGASHIK
  • Short Term Priorities
  • 1)         Bulk Fuel Tank Farm
  • 2)         Barge Landing
  • 3)         Removal of “Winray”
  • 4)         Equipment Storage Building
  • Long Term Priorities
  • 1)         Lengthen Airport Runway
  • 2)         Housing
  • 3)         Upgrade Village Energy Systems
  • 4)         Road construction to Wide Bay
  • IGIUGIG
  • Short Term Priorities
  • 1)         Float Plane Access Road
  • 2)         Runway Related: Extension, Land Acquisition, Lighting & Resurfacing
  • 3)         Washeteria Upgrade
  • 4)         Clinic Energy and Water Upgrade
  • 5)         Sand Storage Building
  • Long Term Priorities
  • 1)         Water line extension
  • 2)         Sewage lagoon upgrade
  • 3)         Kaskanak Road: The Cook Inlet to Bristol Bay
  • 4)         Telecom Infrastructure Upgrade
  • 5)         Tug/Barge
  • ILIAMNA
  • Short Term Priorities
  • 1)         Street Lighting – All Bus Stops
  • 2)         Street Lighting – All Major Facilities
  • 3)         Heavy Equipment‐ Dump Truck, Excavator
  • Long Term Priorities
  • 1)         Housing
  • 2)         Dock Breakwater
  • 3)         Senior living facility
  • KOKHANOK
  • Short Term Priorities
  • 1)         Capacity building
  • 2)         Electrical upgrades
  • 3)         Backhaul project
  • Long Term Priorities
  • 1)         Land Planning
  • 2)         Roads and Infrastructure Renovations
  • 3)         Multi‐Purpose Facility
  • LEVELOCK
  • Short Term Priorities
  • 1)         Water truck
  • 2)         Boat Launch
  • 3)         Fuel Delivery Truck
  • Long Term Priorities
  • 1)         Dock
  • 2)         Airport Extension
  • 3)         Levelock Rec. Park
  • PERRYVILLE
  • Short Term Priorities
  • 1)         Garbage Pick-up Vehicle
  • 2)         Dust Control Vehicle (for road use)
  • Long Term Priorities
  • 1)         Public Dock Feasibility Design Study
  • 2)         Community Swimming Pool
  • PILOT POINT
  • Short Term Priorities
  • 1)         New Bulkhead
  • 2)         Sustainable energy
  • 3)         Airport Extension
  • 4)         Equipment Building
  • Long Term Priorities
  • 1)         Snow Blower for Roads
  • 2)         Line Distribution
  • 3)         Bulkhead and Road Repair
  • 4)         Water Wells
  • 5)         Backup Generators
  • 6)         Batter Pack
  • 7)         Trained Fire Department
  • PORT ALSWORTH
  • Short Term Priorities
  • 1)         Roads & Trails
  • 2)         Building Improvements
  • 3)         Incinerator
  • Long Term Priorities
  • 1)         Solid Waste Ashfill/ Incinerator
  • 2)         Public Airport
  • 3)         Marina
  • PORT HEIDEN
  • Short Term Priorities
  • 1)         Paid-Fuel System
  • 2)         Equipment
  • 3)         HUB center
  • Long Term Priorities
  • 1)         Power distribution
  • 2)         Safe boat harbor
  • 3)         Safe drinking water
  • Funding Partners:
  • USDA: AK Village Solid waste, EDA, USDA Federal, DEC-Loan Program, EPA, Rural Community Assistance Corporation, HUD: Community Development Block Grant, State of Alaska Harbor Facility Grant Program, FEMA, Bonds, Alaska Clean Water Actions Grant, State of Alaska Loan Programs, ANTHC, Department of Energy, State of Alaska and Federal Department of Transportation
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Kate Conley
  • Title: Borough Planner
  • Organization: Lake and Peninsula Borough

Project: City of Dillingham Landfill Shop Building

Project Description: Replace a shop building at the City landfill that was lost to a fire in January 2021. The insurance payment will cover about ½ the replacement cost of the building.

  • Outline of steps required for project to be completed:
  • 1)         Engineering with final cost estimate
  • 2)         Funding/Grant search and application
  • 3)         RFP process
  • 4)         Construction
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • Currently just the City staff. The City uses CRW engineers so they will probably be the engineering firm, although the possibility of a pre-engineered structure is also being investigated.
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: estimate of $1,000,000
  • Timeline: Within next 12 months
  • Funding Partners: None identified at this time.

Evaluation Measures:

  • Completion of the Landfill Shop
  • Dollars saved from reducing transportation costs
  • Increased Revenue for landfill
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Robert Mawson
  • Title: City Manager, Public Works Director
  • Organization: City of Dillingham

Project: Support City of Dillingham Community Infrastructure Projects:

The community of Dillingham is a major hub for the Bristol Bay region, because of this the infrastructure of the community not only supports Dillingham but supports all the Bristol Bay communities to varying levels. To ensure Dillingham can service the outlying communities it is imperative that Dillingham has the necessary infrastructure to support these services-based entities. In the spring, many regional community members travel to Dillingham for the summer to participate in the commercial and subsistence fisheries. They use the infrastructure in Dillingham to support their needs during the summer months.

  • Outline of steps required for project to be completed:
  • 1)         Wastewater System Upgrades – Aeration: $740,000
  • 2)         Water System Improvements- (Phase II & III): $2,262,073
  • 3)         Harbor Float Replacement: $5,200,000
  • 4)         Sewer Lagoon Bank Stabilization Study: $50,000
  • 5)         Harbor Revetments & Breakwater/Emergency Bank Stabilization: $7,525,000 (potential 35:65 Match for USACOE Construction Ready Project)
  • 6)         Alternate Emergency Operations Center (Phase II): $445,000
  • 7)         Public Safety Building Replacement: $21,000,000
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • City of Dillingham; State of Alaska, Department of Transportation, Alaska Department of Environmental Conservation, Alaska Department of Health and Social Services, Alaska Department of Commerce, Community, and Economic Development
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: See above
  • Timeline: by 2026
  • Funding Partners: USDA: AK Village Solid waste, EDA, FEMA, USDA Federal, Bonds, DEC-Loan Program, EPA, Rural Community Assistance Corporation, HUD: Community Development Block Grant, State of Alaska Harbor Facility Grant Program, Alaska Clean Water Actions Grant, State of Alaska Loan Programs
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Robert Mawson
  • Title: City Manager
  • Organization: City of Dillingham

Project: Pilot Point Seafood Processing Facility

Project Description: This proposed seafood processing facility will encompass 35,663 sf with the ability to process approximately 500,000 lbs. of raw product every 24 hours. Surrounding and connected to the plant will be a 210-bed bunkhouse, heavy equipment maintenance shop, fish transportation pipeline, anchored off-shore fish pumping barge, fish waste outfall pipeline and water quality service facility.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. This proposed project is shovel ready.  All Federal, State and Local permits have been obtained.
  2. Construction funding needs to finalized.
  3. The Dago Creek bulkhead structure needs to be upgraded and expanded.
  4. The local airstrip needs to be extended.
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • Pilot Point Tribal Council
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs:  $35 million
  • Timeline:  Completion 2022/23
  • Funding Partners: EDA, USDA, Marine Fisheries International (MFI), City of Pilot Point, Pilot Point Native Corporation, BBEDC, Bristol Bay Development Fund

Evaluation Measures:

  • 15 new jobs created in Pilot Point and Bristol Bay region.
  • Increase in the annual volume of fish purchased/processed at the plant.
  • Increase in annual fish tax collected by the City of Pilot Point for public services.
  • Increase in household per capita income.
  • Jobs Created:
  • Processing Plant: 250
  • Commercial Fishing: 275
  • Supporting Services: 20
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Daniel Kingsley
  • Title: Special Projects Consultant
  • Organization: Pilot Point Tribal Council

Project: Pilot Point Airstrip Extension Project

Project Description: Lengthen the Pilot Point airstrip from 3,400 to 5,300 linear feet.  The construction of a longer airstrip will dramatically increase the volume of seafood and other freight transported by air in and out of Pilot Point, Alaska.  This proposed community infra-structure project is an essential pre-requisite requirement for the economic feasibility of the proposed seafood processing facility.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Secure match funds for the preliminary engineering and project cost estimate study. State DOT-Division of Aviation will complete this engineering study.
  2. Secure construction funds.
  3. All construction will be completed by over-sight provided by State DOT-Division of Aviation.
  4. After construction, all airport operation and maintenance will remain the responsibility of State of Alaska, DOT, Division of Aviation.
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • Pilot Point Tribal Council, State of Alaska DOT-Division of Aviation.
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: $4-5 million (estimate)
  • Timeline:  Completion 2022/23
  • Funding Partners: Marine Fisheries International (MFI), US DOT Tiger Transportation Program, Pilot Point Tribal Council, FAA, US: Department of Transportation 

Evaluation Measures:

  • 1-2 million pounds of seafood products and freight are transported by air on this extended airstrip on an annual basis.
  • All residents of Pilot Point will benefit from reduced air freight costs.
  • Runway is expanded
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Daniel Kingsley
  • Title: Special Projects Consultant
  • Organization: Pilot Point Tribal Council

Project: Ugashik River Road

Project Description: Complete the final design and construct a gravel road from the Village of Pilot Point to the banks of the Ugashik River.  The terminus of this proposed road will be approximately two miles upstream of the Village of Ugashik. The commercial fishers of the Village of Ugashik will be able to transport their fish to the proposed seafood processing plant in Pilot Point.  Also, fuel and propane can be delivered in bulk to the residents of Ugashik from the Pilot Point bulk fuel facility.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Preliminary engineering and cost study.
  2. Secure construction funds.
  3. Complete construction.
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • Pilot Point Tribal Council, State of Alaska DOT-Division of Aviation, BBNA IR Roads Program and BIA.
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: $3 million (estimate)
  • Timeline:  Completion 2022/23
  • Funding Partners: Marine Fisheries International (MFI), BBNA-IR Roads Program, State of Alaska, City of Pilot Point, Pilot Point Tribal Council, US: Department of Transportation

Evaluation Measures:

  • Fish, fuel and propane are transported to and from the villages of Pilot Point to Ugashik.
  • Reduced risk of life-threatening travel via water transport, alleviating the need to transport fish downriver for processing.
  • Reduced cost of bulk fuel and propane for the Ugashik residents.
  • 10 Temporary jobs created during construction.
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Daniel Kingsley
  • Title: Special Projects Consultant
  • Organization: Pilot Point Tribal Council

Project: Pilot Point Village Council Long Range Transportation Plan

Project Description: Top Priority road projects identified by the Pilot Point Village Council.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Constructing a road to the Ugashik River–5.36 miles of road for an estimated cost of $16,651,382
  2. Improve the dock being added to the inventory.
  3. Continue to plan and update the Tribe’s transportation needs, including continued participation in the TTP.
  4. Continue to seek additional funding sources.
  5. People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  6. Pilot Point Village Council, BBNA DOTID Program, Bristol Engineering Services Corporation, Federal Highways Administration
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs:
  • Timeline: 2018-2023
  • Funding Partners: To be determined.
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Local Contact: Suzanne Evanoff
  • Title: Pilot Point Administrator
  • Organization: Pilot Point Tribal Council
  • Name: Dan Breeden
  • Title: BBNA Transportation and Infrastructure Director
  • Organization: Bristol Bay Native Association

Project: Pilot Point Bulkhead & Renovation Project

Project Description: In anticipation of a large seafood processing facility currently being built in Pilot Point the existing bulkhead structure is in poor physical condition and needs to be repaired and expanded to accommodate the increase freight demands of transporting frozen seafood products from the region.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Complete Alaska Native Tribal Health Consortium (ANTHC) “RURAL ALASKA STORM SURGE FLOOD and EROSION ASSESSMENT.”
  2. Secure USACOE Continuing Authorities Program (CAPs) funding for feasibility study of proposed Corps construction work.
  3. Complete Preliminary Engineering and Design.
  4. Complete Construction.
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:)
  • Pilot Point Tribal Council, City of Pilot Point
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: $8 million
  • Timeline:  Completion 2022/23
  • Funding Partners: ANTHC, USACOE, Denali Commission, Marine Fisheries International (MFI), and Pilot Point Tribal Council, EDA, State and Federal Department of Transportation, State of Alaska Harbor Facility Grant Program

Evaluation Measures:

  • 10 seasonal jobs are created for construction
  • 10 full time jobs are created
  • A new/renovated bulkhead large enough to accommodate the shipment of 7 – 10 million pounds of seafood/freight on an annual basis.
  • The bulkhead structure generates enough tariff funding so all Operation & Maintenance (O&M) costs are covered on an annual basis.
  • The bulkhead is designed and built to compensate for the current environmental stressors being experienced in and around Pilot Point’s coastal infrastructures.
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Daniel Kingsley
  • Title: Special Projects Consultant
  • Organization: Pilot Point Tribal Council

Project: Portage Creek Solid Waste Landfill Relocation

Project Description: Portage Creek Tribe needs to relocate the landfill away from the airport.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Land acquisition 
  2. Construction
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • Portage Creek Village Council

Evaluation Measures:

  • Complete construction of new landfill
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Mary Ann Johnson
  • Title: Administrator
  • Organization: Portage Creek Village Council

Project: Camai Community Health Center (CCHC) Expansion Project

Project Description: CCHC seeks funding to expand its federally qualified health center (FQHC) which currently provides more than 1,400 unique individuals with healthcare services; the proposed expansion will allow CCHC to provide more than 1,700 unique individuals with improved healthcare services. CCHC’s existing clinic is in a 5,200 square-foot two-story facility; the Bristol Bay Borough owns both the building and the land. The facility is inadequate to meet the healthcare needs of the community, so CCHC plans to construct a 5,600 square foot addition, which will be connected to the existing building on the north side. The addition will be built on-site on a foundation on adjoining vacant land owned by the Borough, who supports the project. The addition will include space for telemedicine for; physical therapy, cardiology, and behavioral health, along with three new exam rooms, new pharmacy, expansion of the current lab, new x-ray, and emergency room. While local construction workers will be employed, skilled trades will be flown in. Overall, the project will create desperately needed temporary jobs, as well as at least three additional permanent jobs at the clinic. The project will also prevent locals from having to fly to urban cities for relatively minor healthcare needs. We currently have 35% drawings and estimated budget documents.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Complete detailed budget and working drawings.
  2. Apply for and obtain building permit from the Alaska State Fire Marshall
  3. Finalize the financing plan, including applying for and receiving appropriate grants and below market-rate interest loans.
  4. Select a General Contractor, as well as an Owner’s Representative to serve as the project manager.
  5. Hold virtual “all hands” meeting.
  6. Order and pay for construction materials and equipment and arrange for out-of-area skills trades to be scheduled.
  7. Construction material shipped to Naknek via barge.
  8. Construction, demolition, and clearing/grubbing, change orders.
  9. Equipment installation
  10. Final inspection and punch list items.
  11. Certificate of Occupancy.
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • CCHC Executive Director and board, Bristol Bay Borough, Project Architect, Alaska State Fire Marshall, CCHC management team and grant writing consultant, General Contractor, and owner’s Representative to serve as the project/construction manager
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: $9,500,000 total; including $500,000 Pre-development, $ 8,500,000 construction, and $500,000
  •  Equipment
  • Timeline: 2 years
  • Funding Partners: EDA, USDA, Rural Development, Bristol Bay Borough, HRSA, CCHC

Evaluation Measures:

  • 5-10 seasonal jobs created
  • 3 full time jobs created
  • Completion of addition
  • Increase in revenue
  • Increase in patients served
  • Increase in quality health care services
  • Cost savings for local residents
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Mary Swain
  • Title: Executive Director/CEO
  • Organization: Camai Community Health Center (CCHC)

Project: A village-based Processing Plant located in Levelock, AK.

Project Description: The Processing Plant will create new in region jobs, new permit entrants into the fishery. Commercial fishing seasons will last longer for the local fisher and various jobs which includes, processing, youth jobs, training events for certification in HACCP positions and more. This project is an ongoing project which started around 2010. Developments up to date and completed; in 2014 – 15, we purchased a barge and suited it with a crane, paint job and rebuilt one engine. We purchased (3) generators powering up to 1600KW to sufficiently run the plant which was in 2016-17. Those were purchased and shipped to Levelock. We also purchased a 25-person man camp. Then we got (3) water wells installed for the project in 2017. And in 2018 we had contractors installed a 10,000-gallon water waste septic system installed to fit the needs for an 80 – 100 person design facility and sufficient water for the processing plant needs. Our freezing capacity as of now is at, 7500lbs per day.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Levelock Packing Co. is currently being developed into phases of operation for 2019 and beyond.
  2. Phase (1). Establish the business with a hand line, demonstrating the freezing system we have on the ground. Approx. 1200 -1400 fish per day. Hand line with 5 to 8 fish per minute
  3. Priorities for phase (1) are, Electrical infrastructure so the plant can operate.
  4. Permitting in process. (under way)
  5. Connex design and purchase. (Planning Stages)
  6. Water treatment facility (Planning Stages)
  7. Tender Operation & Set up (in Levelock)
  8. Fish Waste Grinder to hook up. (in Levelock)

People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps: Levelock Village Council, Alexander Tallekpalek will be the person overseeing the projects. Alex has over the course of some years used contractors and consultants to fit a fishing criterion and to be established in Levelock. Alex works with the Levelock Village Council and its Administrator to coordinate payments and assistance with the project’s needs. We hired and still use the same contractors to move the project forward on annually funded CBG from BBEDC.

  • Cost Estimates: Levelock Packing Co.
  • Costs: To complete phase (1A) 2019 operation for a 7500lbs per day hand line. Estimation approx.at $500,000.00
  • Phase (1B) to complete the (25) person man camp with foundation and hook up, Office building, more freezing capacity. Etc. Cost Estimate for completion is approx. $3,000,000.00
  • Timeline: Phase (1A) this is to be finished by summer of 2019. Phase (1B) to be developed in late 2019 and early 2020. Followed by Phase (2) and until complete. A 30,000 fish per day processing plant. 
  • Funding Partners: Collaborating with Japanese buyers, US Buyers and Inner State Sales as well. Levelock Village Council utilizes the BBEDC – Community Block Grant of $500,000 annually, Bristol Bay Development Fund.

Evaluation Measures: The FISH are coming! By the MILLIONS!

  • Levelock Packing Co. is creating a slow process to enhance durability and lifestyle in Bristol Bay. This will bring new jobs, new permit holders and education for the future.
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Alexander Tallekpalek, email: tllkplk@yahoo.com
  • Title: Tribal President for Levelock Village Council/ CEO – Levelock Packing Co.
  • Organization: Levelock Village Council – 907-287-3030

Project: BBNA Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan (TTIP) 2021-2025

Project Description: Development of the Long-Range Plans for BBNA Tribes for the purpose of identifying Tribe’s transportation needs, Future land use, and Economic Development activities.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Fiscally and financially constrained
  2. Contains projects eligible for TTP funding
  3. Included in the TTPTIP
  4. Included in the Statewide Transportation Improvement Program (STIP)
  5. Reviewed and updated as necessary by a Tribal Government
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • State of Alaska, Consortium Tribes, Regional Planning Organizations, Cities, and other stakeholders to identify projects to improve multi-modal transportation options locally and regionally.
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: $ 70,092.42 from 2% TTP Planning budget
  • Timeline: October 2021-October 2025
  • Funding Partners: Federal Highways

Evaluation Measures:

  • Development of TTIP evaluates jobs created, money saved, and is dedicated to developing safe and reliable public transportation and infrastructure networks as well as highway safety and emergency preparedness programs within the Bristol Bay Region.
  • Key Project Contacts:
  • Name: Dan Breeden
  • Title: Director
  • Organization: BBNA Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Development
  • Name: Annie Fritze
  • Title: Program Manager
  • Organization: BBNA Department of Transportation and Infrastructure Development

Project: Support the Ekuk-Clarks Point Road.

Project Description: The villages of Ekuk and Clarks Point are creating a road between the two communities. The road will increase both communities’ ability to grow and manage growth by allowing more access to land. Increase both communities’ ability to process and direct market fish. The road will serve the village of Ekuk by allowing access to; the larger Clarks Point airport, Clarks Point Health Clinic, and a new joint landfill site. Clark Point will benefit by having road access to a new landfill site and having more seasonal foot traffic for local businesses.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Design and engineer.
  2. Locate funding.
  3. Permitting.
  4. Construction.
  5. Closeout.
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • Bristol Bay Native Association, Municipalities and Tribes of Clarks Point and Ekuk, State of Alaska, Bristol Engineering Services Corporation, Bristol Bay Economic Development Corporation

Evaluation Measures:

  • The road is complete.
  • The public has access.
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Holly Al Abboodi
  • Title: Tribal Administrator
  • Organization: Ekuk Village Council

Project: Protection of Ekuk Beach Commercial Fishing Set-net Site Infrastructure.

Project Description: The Ekuk Beach is eroding, set net commercial fishers are facing a natural infrastructure failure.  It needs to be protected.  First objective is to find engineering solutions.

  • Outline of steps required for project to be completed:
  • Find funding to hire an Environmental Engineer to assess what solutions can be made.
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • Ekuk Village Council, Ekuk Fisheries, Commercial fishers
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: $70,000 for feasibility study
  • Timeline: 8/30/2023
  • Funding Partners: Army Core of Engineers, Denali Commission, Ekuk IGAP, EDA

Evaluation Measures:

  • Three options for beach protection. One chosen solution, and implementation.
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Jennifer Robinette      
  • Title: Ekuk Environmental Coordinator
  • Organization: Native Village of Ekuk

ProjectPriority Road Projects Identified by the Ekuk Village Council.

Project Description:  Top Priority road projects identified by the Ekuk Village Council.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Continue the planning, design, and construction of Route 1008 listed in the NTTFI.– This is the connection between Ekuk and Clarks Point: 4.31 miles of road for an estimated cost of $12,061,816
  2. Continue to plan and update the Tribe’s transportation needs, including continued participation in the TTP.
  3. Continue to seek additional funding sources.
  4. Continue maintenance activities on routes listed in the NTTFI.
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • Ekuk Village Council, BBNA DOTID Program, Bristol Engineering Services Corporation, Federal Highways Administration
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs:
  • Timeline: 2018-2023
  • Funding Partners: To be determined.
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Local Contact: Holly Al Abboodi
  • Title: Tribal Administrator
  • Organization: Ekuk Village Council
  • Name: Dan Breeden
  • Title: BBNA Transportation and Infrastructure Director
  • Organization: Bristol Bay Native Association

Project:  Clarks Point Long Range Transportation Plan

Project Description:  Top Priority road projects identified by the Clarks Point Village Council.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Improve and/or redesign Hillcrest Drive (R1010 Sections 10 and 20) – This route is a main road in Clarks Point.
  2. Improve road surface and drainage structures on Bayou Loop Road (R1009 Sections 10, 20, and 30) – This route is a main road in Clarks Point.
  3. Improve road surface and drainage structures on Saguyak Avenue (R1007 Section 10) – This route is a main road in Clarks Point.
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • Clarks Point Village Council, BBNA DOTID Program, Bristol Engineering Services Corporation, Federal Highways Administration, Saguyak
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs:
  • Timeline: 2018-2023
  • Funding Partners: To be determined.
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Danielle Aikins
  • Title: Tribal Administrator
  • Organization: Clarks Point Village Council 
  • Name: Dan Breeden
  • Title: BBNA Transportation and Infrastructure Director
  • Organization: Bristol Bay Native Association

Project:  Clarks Point Housing Procurement for Local Growth and Infrastructure

Project Description: To procure safe and affordable housing in Clarks Point to increase local infrastructure and promote growth in the community. Currently, there is not enough housing for those who reside in the community, therefore, there are not housing opportunities for others to relocate to Clarks Point. Without housing, Clarks Point will be incredibly hindered for future opportunities to create jobs and build on existing infrastructure.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Secure grant funding to purchase and build housing
  2. Secure contractors
  3. Order and ship supplies
  4. Promote local hire
  5. Construct housing in Clarks Point
  6. Make housing available to current and new residents
  7. Increase employment opportunities and infrastructure expansion

People/ Organization responsible for completing these steps:

Clarks Point Village Council, the City of Clarks Point, Bristol Bay Housing Authority, Alaska Housing Finance, and ANTHC

  • Cost Estimates:
  • Cost: $750,000
  • Timeline: 2021-2022
  • Funding Partners: Clarks Point Village Council, BBEDC, HUD, USDA

Evaluation Measures:

  • Three houses built
  • Number of seasonal jobs created for construction
  • Number of permanent jobs to maintain homes
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Danielle Aikins
  • Title: Tribal Administrator
  • Organization: Clarks Point Village Council

Project: Dillingham Community Center with a Swimming Pool

Project Description: Leveraging community partners and multijurisdictional funding opportunities to secure funding to design, plan, and construct a community center with a swimming pool in Dillingham. Utilizing a stratified funding scheme that includes regular in-kind donations and partnership with the school district to ensure a sustainable operation.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Develop a Working Group devoted to planning the project.
  2. Obtain formal support from DCSD, Curyung Tribal Council, Choggiung Ltd., BBNC, BBEDC, Nushagak Cooperative, BBAHC, the Dillingham Planning Commission, and the City of Dillingham council to proceed in initial planning.
  3. Complete a feasibility study for the sustainable construction and operation of a community center and swimming pool.
  4. Report findings to the City of Dillingham to proceed and obtain official approval.
  5. Obtain land donation from City or Choggiung Limited for the Community Center. The City has land already platted for a community center. Obtain land use permit from Planning Commission.
  6. Develop budget from feasibility study and begin securing funding, beginning with corporate sponsors and then moving to grants like the USDA Rural Infrastructure grant program that requires matching funds.
  7. Design and planning.
  8. Construction of the Community Center
  9. Community Center is managed by DICE in partnership with BBEDC for staff wages. Partner with DCSD to implement a Lifeguard course to secure regular access to lifeguard-trained volunteers and staff.
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • Current Partners: None currently. Currently, there is much interest amongst residents in a community center and swimming pool. Potential Partners: Dillingham Initiatives for Community Engagement (DICE- being developed currently), Curyung Tribal Council, Bristol Bay Native Corporation, Choggiung Limited, BBAHC, BBEDC, DCSD, BBNA, Nushagak Cooperative, City of Dillingham, John Stelling Foundation
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: Estimated $20 million
  • Timeline: 2022-2026
  • Funding Partners:

Evaluation Measures:

  • Community surveys pre-and post-project and event completion to measure overall attitudes towards community engagement
  • Community surveys throughout the course of the project to determine details of the community center.
  • Community members will be asked to participate in a questionnaire that seeks to measure the participant’s perception of both individual and overall community’s wellbeing pre- and post-project, as well as at defined intervals for up to 10 years after a project. When working on my graduate degree in 2021, I was working on a questionnaire called the SICWA in collaboration with University of Alaska Fairbanks. SICWA stands for “The Subjective Individual and Community Wellbeing Assessment.”
  • Members of the community working groups responsible for planning projects will participate in structured interviews during separate phases of each project to measure change in members’ perception of their ability to facilitate change.
  • All the above data will be compiled into a white paper, which will be shared with the City, BBNA, and all other community stakeholders.
  • Data collection on local economics, such as added revenue events and projects bring to the City and 15 seasonal jobs created.
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Elizabeth Clark
  • Title: Executive Director
  • Organization: Dillingham Initiatives for Community Engagement, Inc. (DICE)

Project: Development of a new nonprofit, DICE: Dillingham Initiatives for Community Engagement.

Project Description: Dillingham Initiatives for Community Engagement (DICE, Inc.) is a proposed 501c (3) not-for-profit located in Dillingham, Alaska. The mission of DICE is, “to increase capacity and infrastructure for community and family engagement opportunities in Dillingham, Alaska.” The organization will seek to mitigate the effects of community trauma through:

  • Data-driven decision making and incorporating community members as key stakeholders.
  • Establishing effective partnerships with tribal, local government, and economic leaders to streamline processes for projects and events.
  • Creating and renovating new and existing parks and green spaces.
  • Developing mini-grants and technical support for monthly community member-led events that are free or low-cost to all.
  • Developing and employing a sustainable model to construct and operate a community center with a swimming pool.

DICE bases its program on the Prevention Institute’s Adverse Community Experiences and Resilience Framework, as well as placemaking strategies described by the organization Projects for Public Spaces.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Identify Initial Board of Directors and incorporate as a 501c3.
  2. Collect community data to identify initial project
  3. Secure formal support through the City of Dillingham
  4. Secure funding through grants, sponsorships, membership dues, and corporate donations.
  5. Design, plan, and implement projects.
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • Currently, Elizabeth Clark is recruiting for the initial Board of Directors for DICE. Potential partners for DICE’s projects and events are Community members as organizers for events and members of working groups to plan projects, Nushagak Cooperative, City of Dillingham, Curyung Tribal Council, BBNA, BBEDC, BBAHC, DCSD, Ekuk Village Council, BBNC, Choggiung, and State of Alaska
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: The first phase of this project’s budget is $365,000. Subsequent phases will likely be slightly less costly. Additionally, the Community Member-Led Event mini-grant program will include $1,000 budgets per event to start. Our hope would be to scale up the amount per event as additional funding and sponsorship is secured. Overall, DICE will rely heavily on in-kind donations of goods and services to complete projects.
  • Timeline: 2022-2026
  • Funding Partners: National Endowments for the Arts

Evaluation Measures:

  • Collection of historical data to measure a space’s engagement in the past (for example, the downtown park—how many events are hosted per year? How many people currently access the park, etc.?) This data is used as a baseline.
  • Community surveys pre- and post-project and event completion to measure overall attitudes towards community engagement.
  • Community members will be asked to participate in a questionnaire that seeks to measure the participant’s perception of both individual and overall community’s wellbeing pre- and post-project, as well as at defined intervals for up to 10 years after a project. When working on my graduate degree in 2021, I was working on a questionnaire called the SICWA in collaboration with University of Alaska Fairbanks. SICWA stands for “The Subjective Individual and Community Wellbeing Assessment.”
  • Members of the community working groups responsible for planning projects will participate in structured interviews during separate phases of each project to measure change in members’ perception of their ability to facilitate change.
  • All the above data will be compiled into a white paper for each project. Each white paper will serve as a final report to the board and will be made available to the public. Additionally, each white paper will be shared with the Prevention Institute to better understand community trauma and resilient frameworks in rural Alaska communities.
  • In addition to the measurement tools used to evaluate the efficacy of DICE’s events and projects, DICE will also collect data on local economics, such as added revenue events and projects bring to the City and number of jobs created.
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Elizabeth Clark
  • Title: Founder and Executive Director
  • Organization: Dillingham Initiatives for Community Engagement, Inc. (DICE)

Project: Complete Phases 2 and 3 of the Dillingham Downtown Park Renovation Project for DICE

Project Description: The downtown park located in Dillingham, Alaska is currently in a dilapidated and unsafe state. Currently Elizabeth Clark is working with BBNA to replace the broken playground equipment with new, multi-age and disability-friendly equipment and safety surfacing. Community survey results have identified additional amenities that citizens would like to see in the space; however, we do not have enough funding at this time to complete the project in full. As a planning team, we are completing Phase 1 of the project in Summer 2022. It is our hope to complete phases 2 and 3 by 2024.

  • Phase 1: Replace existing playground equipment with safe, ADA-compliant equipment and ESTM safety-rated surfacing.
  • Phase 2:
  • Install a covered picnic pavilion with tables, benches, and a BBQ grill
  • Potentially install a “half-shell” structure for community concerts, events, and performances.
  • Potentially install paved walking path inside the perimeter of the park that may double as a speed-skating rink in the winter.
  • Phase 3:
  • Resurface basketball court, install new basketball nets, and install multi-purpose retractable net for tennis, volleyball, etc.
  • Potentially install concrete-block wall at the west end of the basketball court to function as a handball court, wind block for the park, and new space for community art.
  • Replace the perimeter fencing and renovate the entrance to the park.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Complete phase 1
  2. Conduct community survey to measure change in use of the space and effect on overall subjective wellbeing and interviews with working group members to measure perception of agency to make change.
  3. Garner official support to proceed with planning Phase 2 from the City of Dillingham.
  4. Conduct Community surveys to identify priorities. Recruit more community members and stakeholders to existing working group.
  5. Secure funding and community partners to complete Phase 2
  6. Site work, installation, and completion of Phase 2
  7. Conduct community survey to measure change in use of the space and effect on overall subjective wellbeing and interviews with working group members to measure perception of agency to make change.
  8. Garner official support to proceed with planning Phase 3 from the City of Dillingham.
  9. Conduct Community surveys to identify priorities
  10. Secure funding and community partners to complete Phase 3
  11. Site work, installation, and completion of Phase 2
  12. Conduct community survey to measure change in use of the space and effect on overall subjective wellbeing and interviews with working group members to measure perception of agency to make change.
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • Current Partners: Bristol Bay Native Association, Child Development and Workforce Development Departments, City of Dillingham, Dillingham City School District. Potential Partners:Dillingham Initiatives for Community Engagement (DICE), Curyung Tribal Council, Bristol Bay Native Corporation, Choggiung Limited, BBAHC, BBEDC
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: Phase 1 of this project’s budget is $365,000. It is anticipated that each phase will likely incur similar costs.
  • Timeline: 2022-2024

Evaluation Measures:

  • Collection of historical data to measure a space’s engagement in the past (for example, the downtown park—how many events are hosted per year? How many people currently access the park?) This data is used as a baseline.
  • Community surveys pre- and post-project and event completion to measure overall attitudes towards community engagement
  • Community members will be asked to participate in a questionnaire that seeks to measure the participant’s perception of both individual and overall community’s wellbeing pre- and post-project, as well as at defined intervals for up to 10 years after a project. When working on my graduate degree in 2021, I was working on a questionnaire called the SICWA in collaboration with University of Alaska Fairbanks. SICWA stands for “The Subjective Individual and Community Wellbeing Assessment.”
  • Members of the community working groups responsible for planning projects will participate in structured interviews during separate phases of each project to measure change in members’ perception of their ability to facilitate change.
  • All the above data will be compiled into a white paper, which will be shared with the City, BBNA, and all other community stakeholders.
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Elizabeth Clark
  • Title: Education and Training Manager
  • Organization: Bristol Bay Native Association, Child Development Department

Project: Perryville Boat Haul-Out and Pad for the vessels

Project Description: An improved vessel facility is necessary to provide Tribal members with space to begin vessel repair and service businesses to serve the local fleet and transient vessels traveling through the area. The local vessel owners currently travel to Homer, a 400-mile journey through the Shelikof Strait that often has very inclement weather and is downright dangerous during the stormy times of the year, in the early spring and late fall to have repairs and services on their vessels. The cost of vessel fuel is well over well over $5 per gallon, which costs about $2,400 for 400 gallons of diesel for the run to Homer and back to Perryville. Marine Service Facility will improve the transportation needs for the Tribe and assist in developing an economic driver for the Tribe.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Design and Engineering application including the Environmental Narrative to capture the necessary permits, and concurrences for the facility.
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • Native Village of Perryville
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: $250,000
  • Timeline: 12 – 24 Months
  • Funding Partners: Economic Development Agency

Evaluation Measures:

  • Completion of the Boat Haul out and pad
  • 10 to 15 jobs created
  • Number of lives saved
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Gerald Kosbruk
  • Title: Council President
  • Organization: Native Village of Perryville

Project: Perryville Seafood Processing Facility

Project Description: The Native Village of Perryville has acquired seafood quota through the Community Quota Entity for harvest of halibut and cod to sell to niche markets.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Feasibility Study and Business Plan to determine feasibility, sustainability and durability including size and type for the planning of a Seafood Processing Facility.
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • Native Village of Perryville
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: $250,000 (Feasibility Study and Business Plan) $6.75 – $7.75 million (Design and Construction)
  • Timeline: 12 – 36 months
  • Funding Partners: (Feasibility Study) Economic Development Administration

Evaluation Measures:

  • Completion of Seafood Production facility
  • 20 to 30 new jobs created
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Gerald Kosbruk
  • Title: Council President
  • Organization: Native Village of Perryville

Project: Perryville Waterfront Development

Project Description: Develop waterfront facilities to support local and regional fisheries that can scale to meet the needs of regional transportation needs for docks and harbors infrastructure.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Feasibility study completed as a part of the larger Local Community Plan
  2. Site identification and procurement from already identified area per the Army Corp of Engineers report
  3. Pursue funding for each phase of the project
  4. Hire necessary contractor(s) to finish Engineering and Design of Waterfront Development
  5. Hire qualified contractor(s) to complete each phase of construction of the Waterfront Development
  6. Outreach to local/regional fishing fleet to inform of the facilities abilities to support their needs
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • Native Village of Perryville, Perryville CQE, Oceanside Corporation, Perryville Water / Electric Utility, Lake and Penn Borough, National Atmospheric NOAA, Three Star Government Solutions
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: $20 Million +/-
  • Timeline: 5 – 10 years
  • Funding Partners: Native Village of Perryville

Evaluation Measures:  

  • Local Economy Improvement – The amount of revenue injected into local/regional economy.
  • Job Creation/Retention – The amount of FTE jobs created to support the waterfront operations and the retention of the seasonal jobs created through commercial fishing industry.
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Gerald Kosbruk
  • Title: Council President
  • Organization: Native Village of Perryville

Project: Igiugig Diamond Point Barge Landing Facility

Project Description: Igiugig Village plans to develop a barge loading facility on a 140-acre parcel (“Diamond Point”) located on the northern shore of Cottonwood Bay, on the west side of lower Cook Inlet, approximately 45 miles east of Iliamna, Alaska.  Barging of fuel, freight, equipment and construction materials to all the Villages on Lake Iliamna, and beyond (Nondalton and Port Alsworth), has long been a difficult proposition.  The tidelands at Williamsport are dry at low tide and only accessible for 5-6 days per month at best utilizing shallow draft landing craft.  The inability to navigate Williamsport “at will,” has driven the cost of moving freight between Cook Inlet and the villages of Lake Iliamna and Bristol Bay to unreasonably elevated levels in recent years.  Most of the Villages in the Lake Region have been forced to fly in their fuel, at unreasonably prohibitive cost.  Because operators of shallow draft landing craft must operate within the tide “windows” which allow for them to access Williamsport, their other scheduled work in Cook Inlet and elsewhere is also compromised by the need to be available for the “plus 20 foot” tides needed to get into Williamsport. Igiugig believes the project’s success will be proven in the more frequent barges to the Lake Iliamna area which may lower the costs for the residents in the rural communities.  The facility itself and the construction of the facility will employ 10-25 people at the minimum at various times of the construction process.  Once construction is complete, we anticipate the facility to remain active during the shipping season May – October.  All community members who live in the Bristol Bay region, more specifically in and around Lake Iliamna region will be impacted.  

Outline of steps required for project to be completed: 

  1. Secure Funding
  2. Igiugig Village and ILC have collaborated with several independent licensed engineers in our over twenty years of construction experience. We plan to contract with a licensed engineer to design and oversee the Project.
  3. Coordinate material purchases and barge deliveries early in the design process.
  4. Purchase & ship via barge necessary equipment for construction
  5. Hire workforce by utilizing many of our Tribal citizens and other skilled local residents in our neighboring communities.
  6. Start Construction: The Project will include the construction of a 200-foot-long breakwater, a barge landing, and a fill pad.
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps: 
  • Karl Hill, Vice President of the Igiugig Tribal Council and General Manager of ILC – Iliamna Lake Contractors, will be the Project Manager and will coordinate with the engineer on Project oversight. We also intend to employ as many of our Tribal citizens as possible and other residents in our community that have the skill and dedication to complete the Project
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: $5,000,000 – $8,000,000 est. based on scarcity of materials and necessary equipment purchases
  • Timeline: 2022-2025
  • Funding Partners: EDA, DOT, State of Alaska, Igiugig Village, ARPA funds, Lake & Peninsula Borough, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Evaluation Measures: 

  • 10 to 25 people employed
  • Reduction in cost of living
  • Completion of barge landing
  • Southwest Alaska transportation and accessibility increased
  • Key Project Contact: 
  • Name: AlexAnna Salmon
  • Title: President
  • Organization: Igiugig Village Council

Project:  Igiugig Float Plane Lake Access Road aka High Ridge Road Phase II

Project Description: Igiugig Village plans to develop a road to access a more protected float plane lake commonly utilized during poor weather conditions for nearby lodges and local residents. This project is a shovel ready project.  Float Plane Access Road has been on the Capital Improvement List for almost a decade.  This is a safety concern and need for our community.  We are reminded of this need every Spring and Fall while ice is still present on the Lake Iliamna and in the Kvichak River.  This project has also been previously included in a prior year regional and local CEDS – Comprehensive Economic Development Strategy, the STIP – Statewide Transportation Improvement Program and has been at the top of our LRTP – Long Range Transportation Plan,  TTIP – Tribal Transportation Improvement Plan section 3.6 Project by Priority since 2013.  It is priority #1, on Route # 0160, Section 20 and is 0.80 miles in length.  Commonly referred to as Float Plane Access Road, aka High Ridge Road Phase II.  This has remained as a high priority not only due to the safety concerns, but because it is a shovel ready project with skilled labor in the region to complete the project timely and efficiently. NOTE: Funding for design and feasibility studies in the amount of $100,000 were received from (IRR) Indian Reservation Roads currently referred to as (TTP) Tribal Transportation Program operated by U.S. Dept. of Transportation in 2012.  Igiugig Village has also set aside funds for continuation of this project in the amount of $200,000 which is over 20% of the project construction cost. Various funding sources IVC has sought were competitive in nature and were not funded.  We have also brought our TTP Road Maintenance Activities back in-house so we can save up the funds we need to complete this project and other local projects from our RFA – Referenced Funding Agreement with the BIA Government to Government Contract we receive annually.    

Outline of steps required for project to be completed: 

  1. Secure remaining funding for shovel ready project utilizing TTP funds as matching funds.
  2. Develop contract with Igiugig Village’s wholly owned subsidiary Iliamna Lake Contractors with over twenty years of construction experience.  ILC has built numerous roads in and around the Southwest Alaska region. All design work and surveys/permitting are complete.  We plan to extend the High Ridge Road in this planned Phase II to access the Float Plane Lake.
  3. Coordinate material purchases and barge deliveries as early as possible.
  4. Hire workforce by utilizing many of our Tribal citizens and other skilled local residents in our neighboring communities.
  5. Start Construction: The Project will include the construction of a 0.8-mile road extension in a current subdivision.
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps: 
  • Karl Hill, Vice President of the Igiugig Tribal Council and General Manager of ILC – Iliamna Lake Contractors, will be the Project Manager and will coordinate with the engineer on Project oversight. We also intend to employ as many of our Tribal citizens as possible and other residents in our community that have the skill and dedication to complete the Project
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: $1,060,000 est. based on prior quotes and slight increase due to inflation and scarcity of materials
  • Timeline: 2022-2023
  • Funding Partners: BIA – Tribal Transportation Program, State of Alaska, Igiugig Village, ARPA funds, Lake & Peninsula Borough, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers

Evaluation Measures: 

  • Increased usage of this location for public safety
  • 4-8 Jobs
  • Completed Road
  • Improved access to the village during shoulder seasons
  • Less local accidents
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Karl Hill
  • Title: Vice-President, TTP Roads Manager
  • Organization: Igiugig Village Council

Project: Provide Port Heiden with a Salmon Processing Facility to Ensure Future Economic Stability for our Community.

Project Description: The Native Village of Port Heiden is in the process of constructing the Meshik Processing Facility in the community of Port Heiden to ensure future economic stability for our local people. Developing this salmon processing facility in our home will allow for residents to have jobs as well as assure future financial stability for our community.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Remainder of construction on inside of building to be done.
  2. Refrigeration and freezing units to be installed.
  3. Equipment purchased for hauling, processing, and storing salmon.
  4. Outside perimeter for fish waste disposal built.
  5. Equipment barged in that has already been purchased.
  6. Building inspections done to obtain permits needed to operate.

People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps: The Native Village of Port Heiden (NVPH) and Meshik Seafoods, LLC (a company started under NVPH) is responsible for completing the above steps to assure that the Meshik Processing Facility will be accurately built for salmon processing.

  • Cost Estimates: 
  • Costs: $ 1,753,765,74 includes A&E costs, equipment, freight, personnel/labor, travel, and supplies.
    Timeline: February 2019 – May 2019
    Funding Partners: Funding up to this point has been acquired through the BBEDC Community Block Grant, EDA, and Bristol Bay Development Fund

Evaluation Measures:

  • This project will ensure up to ten jobs for locals to start with, including laborers, a foreman, as well as a business manager.
  • As Meshik Seafoods grows as well as the need for our product we hope to have if not doubled, then tripled the number of jobs we bring to our community.
  • During the construction so far, we have created jobs for up to twenty people at one time.
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Maxine Christensen
  • Title: Meshik Seafoods, LLC Manager
  • Organization: Native Village of Port Heiden

Project: Chignik Memorial Park

Project Description: The goal of this project is to develop land that has already been set aside, into a beautiful memorial park. To construct a gazebo or large covered open-air structure, and make available for sale, plaques to honor elders, people, and/or organizations that have played important roles in the community. In addition, install park-benches, picnic tables and a barbeque area to allow community to host events for planning festivities like a salmon bake when ferry and cruise ships come in. Events can promote small businesses by allowing local artists, crafters, bakers, and others to set up booths in the park. All will boost tourism revenue and promote local culture.

Outline of steps required for project to be completed:

  1. Develop land by excavating, leveling, and seeding with grass
  2. Create a layout or map of the park
  3. Construct the gazebo or main structure
  4. Install benches tables and barbeque
  5. Promote and host events
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • The City of Chignik and Chignik Bay Tribal Council
  • Cost Estimates:
  • Costs: Unknown
  • Timeline:
  • Funding Partners:

Evaluation Measures:

  • Completion of park improvement
  • Five temporary jobs created
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Dannica Anderson
  • Title: Deputy Clerk
  • Organization: City of Chignik

Project: Nondalton Iliamna Road and Bridge Project

Project Description: Create a road and bridge between Nondalton and Iliamna. This project will increase the quality of life and provide for alternative economic opportunities. Currently the community of Nondalton has limited delivery of goods and services due to limited air cargo availability since the COVID-19 pandemic. This project would allow for alternative access for fuel and goods to be accessed through Iliamna’s larger airport.

  • Outline of steps required for project to be completed:
  • Design and engineering
  • Secured funding
  • Construction
  • People/Organizations responsible for completing these steps:
  • City of Nondalton, Lake and Pen Borough, Village of Iliamna, State of Alaska.

Cost Estimates:

  • Costs: unknown
  • Timeline: 5 years
  • Funding Partners: U.S. Department of Transportation, State of Alaska Department of Transportation, Denali Commission.
  • Evaluation Measures:
  • Increased access to fuel and goods
  • Secured access to basic living needs
  • 30 jobs created
  • Key Project Contact:
  • Name: Robert Tracey
  • Title: Mayor of Nondalton
  • Organization: City of Nondalton

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